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Data Breaches

Vlog with Dr. Kelli Frakes
Program Director, Homeland Security at American Military University

Data security is a major concern across multiple industries. So, what is being done to combat the near-weekly data breach issues that are not only affecting large companies, but private citizens? Dr. Frakes discusses chip and pin use in the credit card industry, and whether it really is effective enough to combat the data breaches that put private citizens at risk.

Last Monday – the 15th – password storage maker LastPass was hacked, exposing the email addresses and encrypted master passwords of its users. Last Tuesday – the 16th – in Congressional testimony, House Oversight Chairman, Jason Chaffetz, said that federal cybersecurity “stinks” in response to the governmental breach that happened earlier this month, exposing the personal information of millions of current, former, and prospective federal employees.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House passed a bill Thursday encouraging private companies to share information about cyber attacks with federal authorities in an attempt to combat the growing problem.

The bill grants protection from liability for companies that share information and follow certain procedures.

Companies have been reluctant to share internal data about cyber attacks for fear of being sued, hurting efforts to fight criminals stealing personal information and state-sponsored campaigns stealing American intellectual property.

By Rick Whitman
Special Contributor to In Homeland Security

Over the past decade, the number of security breaches seems extraordinary. Trade magazines and Congressional testimony reveal both the extent of cyber attacks and the growing concerns about both the quantity and the sensitivity of information losses. To date, these losses include personal information, business practices, trade secrets, and even government secrets.

For decades, we have heard a lot of talk from American officials, industry experts, and others about the supposed threat of a “cyber 9/11,” “cyber Pearl Harbor,” “cyber Katrina,” or even “cyber Sandy.” In short, we have been warned repeatedly that “cyber doom” is coming. Indeed, as recently as last fall, cyber doom was in the news as a result of the cyber attack on Sony.

(Forbes)
Marc Goodman, an international security expert, was one of the most impressive speakers at Money 20/20 in Las Vegas last year, and now his book Future Crimes is out with an astounding list of ways that bad guys are after money, business secrets, proprietary technology and government information. He also goes into some alarming detail of how “free” software and services, from Gmail to Facebook, uses the personal information of users to make money from advertisers and companies that want to sell.

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan is aiming to invest in cyber security and position itself as a national leader in the field as attacks on governments increase.

The state receives more than 730,000 attempted cyber attacks daily, and that number is rising as hackers and thieves try to steal valuable information from or shut down Michigan’s networks.