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Middle East

By John Ubaldi
Contributor, In Homeland Security

The Middle East has always confounded the United States, but in recent years the region has exploded into a chaotic mess, one in which the U.S. seems to be reacting to events instead of shaping events.

By Diane L. Maye
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Recently, after a month-long military operation, the Iraqi government declared victory over the Islamic State in the city of Tikrit, the hometown of Saddam Hussein and a stronghold for IS forces.

Tikrit’s recapture could not have been accomplished without the help of a popular mobilization movement known as the Hash’d al Shaabi, which consists of primarily Shi’ia paramilitary groups, and coordination from Iranian military advisors from the elite Iranian Revolutionary Guard’s Quds Force.

By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Instead of stability, the U.S. focused on al-Qaida in the Arab Peninsula (AQAP) as the threat, completely ignoring the socio-political fragility and lack of necessary institutions there. America is becoming more tactically proficient at becoming strategically deficient in the complex socio-political landscape of the Middle East.

By Tim Boyd
Special Guest Contributor

There are at least two ways to attack, weaken, and destroy any enemy or opposing force. It can be done from either an external or an internal position. A building may be exploded using a missile or some source of attack to its external structure, which causes a weakening to the entire building, or the building might be imploded by a destructive source within.