By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is suspected of the Boston Marathon Bombing that killed three and injured over 260. His defense lawyers are trying to mitigate his death sentence by depicting his older brother as the leader and that he was pushed over the edge by the FBI.
By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Today, in Kabul, four terrorists dressed as women gained access to a next door residential area and fired rocket-propelled grenades at the headquarters for the Afghan’s Independent Election Commission. After a standoff with the police, the terrorists were destroyed, two policemen injured and no reporting of any innocent dead.

By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

The White House gave a press release describing Russian President Vladimir Putin reaching out and taking the initiative to call President Obama after the annexation of Crimea and global outrage building up against him and his country.

President Obama wants Putin to pull back troops and have them stand down on the Eastern Ukrainian border.

By William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security

The United Nations General Assembly passed a non-binding resolution that reaffirms Ukraine’s territorial integrity and describes the Crimean referendum for independence, and subsequent annexation by Russia, as illegal. Though the resolution passed, its non-binding nature makes the declaration an empty gesture. Russia will not concede Crimea and the critics of the annexation have essentially accepted that as fact.

By Donald Sassano
In Homeland Security Guest Contributor

New controversies have erupted concerning Michael Oren, Israel’s former ambassador to the United States, and Ron Dermer, his successor.  Here’s the backstory:

By 2009, criticism of Israeli behavior began to bubble to the surface principally due to the mainstreaming efforts of journalists Andrew Sullivan and Philip Weiss, professors Steven Walt and John Mearsheimer, and others who began to take aim at the “special relationship” that exists between Israel and the United States. 

By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

After annexing Crimea under a military occupation and pro-Russian militias, Moscow seizes one of the last Ukrainian military bases there. It was reported that Russia’s Defense Ministry claimed the Russian flags now flying over 189 military installations in Crimea.
By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

It’s no surprise that US citizen Edward Snowden, who is living in the oppressive authoritarian mob state of Russia, just released another treasonous intelligence leak regarding US SIGINT intelligence operations overseas. After damaging US-EU relations, he seems bent on destroying US-China relations as well.
By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

With the annexation of Crimea and the new Russian expansionist agenda, should China’s importance now be seen as more critical to Washington than before? It would seem that the US-China strategic relationship should always have been taken more seriously and certainly handled better.
By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Michelle Obama’s visit to China may be more promising for US-China relations than any attempts of the Administration since attempts of closer ties at the “Annenberg Retreat” in California, June of last year.

By William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security

The crisis between Ukraine and Russia revolving around Crimean independence has naturally drawn in the U.S., the EU, and NATO. European nations that were once part of the Eastern Bloc of the Soviet Union are understandably nervous given the lack of response from the Western powers to the Russian incursion in Georgia, the unseating of the Kyrgyz government in 2010, and this most recent move to annex Crimea.

By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

In December 2013, the Department of Justice filed a first indictment of Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade over the charge of visa fraud and false statements. The indictment was issued by a grand jury but thrown out by the U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin, who ruled that she was protected by diplomatic immunity: “appointed a Counselor to the Permanent Mission of India to the United Nations.”

The Justice Department is now seeking a second indictment.