Update: US Military Involvement in the Syrian Civil War

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

A Gallup poll taken at the end of May revealed that 68 percent of Americans do not want the US to become militarily involved in the Syrian Civil War. Not many expected diplomatic and economic measures to make a difference but were strongly against any military option.

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Fear of China Is Misplaced Anxiety

By Jeffrey A. James, Ph.D.
Professor, National Security Studies at American Public University

The United States has been buffeted in the past decade and a half by fears: terrorism; the appearance of relative decline vis-à-vis other rapidly growing countries; our undefined and changing place in a world we have dominated since the early 1990s; and our failing political institutions, trumpeted for so long as the pinnacle of democratic expression.

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The DARPA Robotics Challenge

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is undertaking a revolution in robotics with its two-year Robotics Challenge that began last October. The DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) is a competition prompting companies, entrants and inventors to develop the best humanoid robot capable of rescuing humans from difficult and potentially hazardous environments.

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The Making of Egypt’s Interim Government

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

After the military deposed the democratically elected Mohamed Morsi two weeks ago, Interim President Adly Mansour is already selecting his cabinet. The position of Vice President was restored and winner of Nobel Peace Prize Mohamed Mustafa ElBaradei was appointed.

The government represents what is believed to be the larger majority interests of Egypt—those of national secularism versus former President Morsi’s Islamists and their salafist allies.

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Would the U.S. Really Kill Edward Snowden?

William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security

The short answer to this question is no. The long answer is far more practical than one would assume, however. Since the Snowden affair came to light many of his lionizing supporters immediately claimed that the U.S. government would run roughshod over other nations in an attempt to silence him.

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Court sides with Yahoo in Data Collection Case

Tami Abdollah, The Associated Press
Special to In Homeland Security

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Yahoo has won a court fight that could help the public learn more about the government’s efforts to obtain data from Internet users.

The U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which reviews government requests to spy on individuals, ruled Monday that information should be made public about a 2008 case that ordered Yahoo Inc.

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