Report: NSA Spied on Leaders of Brazil, Mexico

Bradley Brooks, The Associated Press
Special to In Homeland Security

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The National Security Agency’s spy program targeted the communications of the Brazilian and Mexican presidents, and in the case of Mexico’s leader accessed the content of emails before he was elected, the U.S. journalist who obtained secret documents from NSA leaker Edward Snowden said Sunday.

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China Argues Against US Action Against Syria

The Associated Press
Special to In Homeland Security

BEIJING (AP) — China on Monday urged the U.S. not to take unilateral action against Syria in response to last month’s chemical weapons attack against civilians.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said Washington had briefed Beijing over the matter and China was highly concerned about any use of chemical weapons.

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Can One Brain Really Control Another Brain?

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Highly cited in the news media has been the direct neural motor control of researcher Andrea Stocco’s finger over the internet by partner Rajesh Rao at the University of Washington. They have labeled this “brain control” but it is really just another variation of brain-computer interfacing (BCI).

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The White House, the World and Syria

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

As of now, President Barack Obama has relegated the use of military action against Syria to Congress in a surprise move. After stating his position supporting US military strikes against the Bashar al Assad regime’s most recent chemical weapons attack, it will ultimately be Congress’ decision. After the British Parliament voted against their state’s involvement, against the wishes of the Prime Minister, and the fact that Congress does not appear to be racing back for a special session dealing with Syria, the military strikes may again be stalled.

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US Worried About NKorea’s Cyber, Missile Threats

Lolita C. Baldor, The Associated Press
Special to In Homeland Security

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea’s military needs to improve its missile defense and cyber capabilities to better defend against persistent threats from Pyongyang, the commander of U.S. forces in Korea said Tuesday.

Gen. James Thurman, who will leave his command Wednesday and retire, offered a sobering assessment of North Korea’s continued drive to become a nuclear power and expressed disappointment in its young leader, Kim Jong Un.

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