Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

An explosion in Taiyuan, China killed one and injures eight others this morning. The attack was right outside the Communist Party office for the Shanxi province.

This is the second political terrorist incident reported in the news. The previous was cited as an unsuccessful plot in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, last week.

By William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security

Pyongyang recently announced that one of its naval vessels had sunk and all crew members were lost. The announcement was accompanied by a photo of Kim Jong-un visiting a newly built memorial for the sailors who perished in mid-October. Reuters reported that 19 markers were visible in the photo, though a higher casualty count is possible.

Eileen Sullivan, The Associated Press
Special to In Homeland Security

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the White House called some of the nation’s major law enforcement associations with a heads-up that the president would tap Jeh Johnson to run the Homeland Security Department, the response on the other end of the line was brief: Who?

The former Pentagon lawyer and longtime Barack Obama supporter is not a household name throughout the 18,000 law enforcement agencies around the country — agencies that are considered among the Homeland Security Department’s most important partners.

Karen DeYoung, The Washington Post
Special to In Homeland Security

WARSAW—The United States welcomes conversations with allies to alleviate their concerns about National Security Agency spying, Secretary of State John F. Kerry said here Tuesday.

“We’re all in this together . . . and we have to strike the right balance between protecting our citizens and obviously protecting the privacy of our citizens,” Kerry said at a news conference with Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski.

Dominic Basulto, The Washington Post
Special to In Homeland Security

The number of confirmed cyber attacks reported by federal agencies has skyrocketed over the past six years, from 5,503 in 2006 to 48,562 in 2012. The U.S. Defense Department claims there are 10 million attempted cyber intrusion attempts made against it every single day , as does the National Nuclear Security Administration.

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

India is scheduled to launch a 350 ton rocket hauling an orbiter to Mars on November 5. If successful, they will trail behind the US, Russia and the EU and beat China and Japan in the Mars excursion.

“Orbiting Mars itself is a challenge,” said Indian Space Research Organization Chairman K Radhakrishnan.

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

“We have decided not to enter Geneva talks unless it is with dignity, and unless there is a successful transfer of power with a specific timeframe, and without the occupier Iran at the negotiating table.”

-Syrian National Coalition President Ahmad Jarba

The Syrian Opposition is drifting closer to the Arab League or the Organization of Islamic Cooperation and farther away from the UN and Geneva II.

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Useless laws and regulations, we have plenty. They make us feel better. They resolve a political need for officer holders to appease public concern. And this is the problem. Rules and regulations are only as good as they have function and value.

This outdated regulation that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) held on to for some fifty years has finally been partially lifted.

By William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security

Everybody spies. Intelligence professionals acknowledge this fact easily enough and the public at large, too, may understand this to some extent, though the intricacies of how and what intelligence actually is may remain a mystery to them. In fact, most Americans are at least familiar with the existence of the CIA and FBI due to media exposure and Hollywood dramatization, but these are only two agencies out of 16 in the U.S.

Ellen Nakashima, The Washington Post
Special to In Homeland Security

After nearly five months of controversy and debate, members of Congress may face a clear choice over the National Security Agency’s program to collect the phone records of nearly every American: endorse it or shut it down.

On Tuesday, lawmakers are expected to introduce the first comprehensive NSA legislation since the agency’s phone records program was disclosed in June.

Ellen Nakashima & Karen DeYoung, The Washington Post
Special to In Homeland Security

The director of the National Security Agency on Tuesday dismissed as “completely false” reports that his agency swept up millions of phone records of European citizens, and he revealed that data collected by NATO allies were shared with the United States.

Gen. Keith Alexander said foreign intelligence services collected phone records in war zones and other areas outside their borders and provided them to the spy agency — an operation that was misunderstood by French and Spanish newspapers that reported that the NSA was conducting surveillance in their countries.

Anne Gearan, The Washington Post
Special to In Homeland Security

A bipartisan group of foreign policy leaders in the Senate warned in unusually blunt terms Tuesday that Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki may be pulling his country back toward civil war.

In a letter to President Obama timed for Maliki’s visit to Washington, the leaders of the Senate defense and foreign affairs committees said Maliki is contributing to what the lawmakers called an alarming slide toward sectarian violence compounded by the Syrian civil war next door.