By William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security

Egypt’s interim Prime Minister Hazem Beblawi said that “Today was a difficult day.” Quite frankly, this has to be the most profound understatement of the day. Though the Egyptian military and police did state that the clearing of the protests sites would happen, the loss of life today is rather high.

Elena Mastors, Counter Terrorist Magazine & Dean of Doctoral Studies at American Military University
Special to In Homeland Security

At approximately 2:49 pm on April 15th, two explosions occurred near the Boston Marathon finish line. Some runners had already crossed the finish line.[i] The first explosion took place in front of 671 Boylston Street and the second in front of 755 Boylston Street, about a block away and approximately ten seconds later.

Marie Szaniszlo, Boston Herald
Special to In Homeland Security

Recent revelations about China hacking U.S. computers have raised awareness of cyber espionage, but some of the greatest threats local governments face are cyber attacks that can be used to defraud people or to plunge an entire city or state into chaos, according to one security expert.

By William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security

Earlier this week India activated the reactor on board its indigenously built INS Arihant nuclear submarine and launched a new aircraft carrier, the INS Vikrant, that was likewise homegrown. India has employed aircraft carriers and nuclear powered submarines in its navy previously, but the local build of these crafts add a different dimension to India’s military capabilities.

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

“I have today mandated a modification of the Justice Department’s charging policies so that certain low-level, nonviolent drug offenders who have no ties to large-scale organizations, gangs or cartels will no longer be charged with offenses that impose draconian mandatory minimum sentences,” Attorney General Eric Holder said.

By Dr. Melissa Schnyder
Adjunct Professor, International Relations at American Public University

International relations scholars and policy analysts have become increasingly concerned with global environmental problems over the last few decades. A growing focus has emerged on the potential for intra-state conflict as a result of overuse of shared natural resources, as well as conflict due to growing resource scarcity.

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

While Israel and Egypt may have common Islamic militant enemies in the Sinai, they do not of course have common objectives. It was rumored that Israel recently took out suspects with a drone- a preventive strike on Islamic militants in the Sinai that killed four or five on Friday, before they could initiate a rocket attack.

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

The art of peaceful mental cultivation is not something that is traditionally associated with the US military and where controlled aggression, survival and a long line of martial traditions prevail. Isn’t meditation something that hippies did in the ‘60s and ‘70s?

All that is about to change.

By William Tucker
Chief Correspondent for In Homeland Security

Three suspected U.S. UAV strikes have taken in place in Yemen today reportedly killing 12 militants. UAV strikes can be fluid events and the death toll may rise among those currently reported as injured. The U.S. has taken a more aggressive counterterrorism role in Yemen with UAV strike having tripled since 2011.

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

“The state of Egypt appreciates the efforts of friendly nations and understands the reasons why they did not achieve their desired objectives, and holds the Muslim Brotherhood full responsibility for the failure of these efforts,” said Interim President Adly Manour.

Despite Europe and America’s best efforts to bring the Muslim Brotherhood and the Military into a reconciliation process, Egyptian authorities are finished.

The Associated Press
Special to In Homeland Security

MOSCOW (AP) — The Russian lawyer for Edward Snowden said Tuesday that he has sent an official invitation to the National Security Agency leaker’s father to visit Russia and help his fugitive son decide his next steps.

Lon Snowden needs the invitation to be issued a Russian visa, which the lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, said he hoped would happen in the coming days.

David Ferris, Forbes
Special to In Homeland Security

In Washington D.C. this morning, security officials from some of the country’s largest utilities met to discuss how to prepare for the possibility of a large-scale cyberattack on the power grid. Most agreed that it is only a matter of time before one comes to pass, and one official said his company is beginning to view the threat as on par with that of a large storm or hurricane.

TMax Ehrenfreund, The Washington Post
Special to In Homeland Security

The trial of Maj. Nidal Hasan, the Army psychiatrist accused of killing 13 people in a mass shooting at Fort Hood, Tex., in 2009, began today. Hasan, who was paralyzed below the waist by a police bullet during the incident, is representing himself in the trial, and cited his religion in his remarks to jurors today:

Some of the survivors of the incident are looking forward to confronting Hasan at the trial:

Authorities are seeking the death penalty for Hasan, but capital crimes are especially difficult to prosecute under military law, which explains why so many delays have postponed Hasan’s trial:

The United States also confronts a civil suit in Hasan’s case:

max.ehrenfreund@washpost.com

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