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The Cryogenic Computer Complexity Program

By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

The Cryogenic Computer Complexity Program (C3) is a supercomputer attempt to break the exaFLOP barrier. The exascale is measures in quintillions of calculations per second. The C3 Program is being run by the U.S. Intelligence Community’s Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

DARPA’s Ground-X Vehicle Technology Program

By Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Whatever comes after military-grade Humvees will be something more akin to the popular video game known as HALO. The early October concept video release of the Ground-X Vehicle Technology Program (The GXV-T Program) shows a futuristic ground vehicle design that has more of a look and feel of a small and fast space rover than an earthbound military vehicle.

In Future, Extreme Weather Fluctuations May Cripple Critical Infrastructure

Brett Daniel Shehadey
Special Contributor for In Homeland Security

Untold damage awaits the unprepared in the global climate changing process. For those cities and countries that are not anticipating life-threatening weather fluctuations, including but not limited to tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and extreme temperatures, the casualties will be devastating. One morning might be warm and cozy and the afternoon below zero degrees Celsius.

Why Did We Make The Atomic Bomb?

James Conca, Forbes
Special to In Homeland Security

This is a very, very important question, as relevant today as it was in 1943. Richard Rhodes recently gave a lecture at the Hanford site in Washington State for the 70th Anniversary of the Manhattan Project that provides more insight into this issue than any other I have ever heard. 

What Message Is The Government Sending With Serious Cyber-Vulnerabilities At Homeland Security?

Joseph Steinberg, Forbes
Special to In Homeland Security

A new report from its own Inspector General notes that the US Department of Homeland Security –  the government division ostensibly responsible for ensuring cybersecurity throughout the nation – itself suffers from serious cyber-vulnerabilities.

The report notes that problems exist even on Top Secret systems, and that among other problems, the Department of Homeland Security commonly utilizes inadequate authentication, fails to properly track data and hence is unable to adequately monitor who is accessing what information, and runs seriously outdated software.