Home Terrorism & Threats The Latest: Subway Bomb Suspect Charged

The Latest: Subway Bomb Suspect Charged

0

NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the blast in the New York City subway system (all times local):

9:15 a.m.

The New York Police Department says the man accused of the subway bombing has been charged with supporting an act of terrorism.

The NYPD said Tuesday on Twitter that Akayed Ullah also has been charged with making at terroristic threat and weapon possession.

Federal charges are expected later.

Deputy Commissioner for Counterterrorism and Intelligence John Miller said on CBS “This Morning” on Tuesday that Ullah was not on police or the FBI’s radar before the Monday morning bomb in Times Square.

___

9 a.m.

Bomb-sniffing dogs are part of the police presence as commuters resume their daily activities in the wake of the blast in a New York City subway passageway.

A passageway connecting the Port Authority bus terminal and the Times Square subway station is back in use Tuesday, one day after a bomb exploded there.

Maintenance worker Jorge Garcia, who was taking the “7” train out of Times Square on Tuesday, says he’s gotten used to security concerns. He says he was about three blocks away when the World Trade Center came down.

Garcia says he tries not to think about “the negative stuff” so he can “have a positive day.”

___

8:20 a.m.

A passageway connecting New York City’s Port Authority bus terminal and the Times Square subway station is back in use the day after a bomb went off there.

Security remains tight citywide on Tuesday.

An NYPD official says the man accused of detonating the bomb was not previously known to authorities.

Deputy Commissioner for Counterterrorism and Intelligence John Miller said on CBS “This Morning” that Akayed Ullah wasn’t on police or FBI’s radar before the Monday morning bomb in Times Square.

He says it’s getting harder and harder to defend against such acts because would-be terrorists are going online to read propaganda without speaking with any larger group.

___

7:50 a.m.

An NYPD official says the man accused of detonating a bomb in the New York City subway wasn’t known to authorities before the incident.

Deputy Commissioner for Counterterrorism and Intelligence John Miller said on CBS “This Morning” on Tuesday that Akayed Ullah wasn’t on police or FBI’s radar before the Monday morning bomb in Times Square.

He says it’s getting harder and harder to defend against such acts because would-be terrorists are going online to read propaganda without speaking with any larger group.

Authorities say Ullah intentionally set off the bomb in a long passageway connecting Seventh and Eighth Avenues near Times Square.

Only three other people were injured and they suffered ringing in ears and headaches. Ullah suffered burns to his body and hands. He is talking with police.

His family says they were horrified of the news.

__

12:20 a.m.

A would-be suicide bomber’s rush-hour blast in the heart of the New York City subway system is adding new fuel to President Donald Trump’s push to limit immigration based on family ties.

Trump is renewing his criticisms of U.S. immigration policy after Monday’s explosion in a passageway in the sprawling Times Square subway station.

Suspect Akayed Ullah came to the U.S. from Bangladesh in 2011 on a visa available to certain relatives of U.S. citizens.

Trump says that program “is incompatible with national security.” Trump’s administration has called for limiting family-based green cards to spouses and minor children.

Authorities say Ullah was inspired by Islamic State extremists. The crude pipe bomb left him with burns and several other people with minor injuries.

His family says it’s “deeply saddened.”

 

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Comments

comments

Roots In The Military. Relevant To All.

American Military University (AMU) is proud to be the #1 provider of higher education to the U.S. military, based on FY 2018 DoD tuition assistance data, as reported by Military Times, 2019. At AMU, you’ll find instructors who are former leaders in the military, national security, and the public sector who bring their field-tested skills and strategies into the online classroom. And we work to keep our curriculum and content relevant to help you stay ahead of industry trends. Join the 64,000 U.S. military men and women earning degrees at American Military University.

Request Information

Please complete this form and we’ll contact you with more information about AMU. All fields except phone are required.

Validation message here
Validation message here
Validation message here
Validation message here
Validation message here
Validation message here
Validation message here
Validation message here
Validation message here
Ready to apply? Start your application today.

We value your privacy.

By submitting this form, you agree to receive emails, texts, and phone calls and messages from American Public University System, Inc. which includes American Military University (AMU) and American Public University (APU), its affiliates, and representatives. I understand that this consent is not a condition of enrollment or purchase.

You may withdraw your consent at any time. Please refer to our privacy policy, terms, or contact us for more details.